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Douglass, Frederick (1818-1895) The Exodus [oppression of blacks in the South and their leaving for the North]

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC07563 Author/Creator: Douglass, Frederick (1818-1895) Place Written: Washington Type: Autograph manuscript signed Date: 1879/05/19 Pagination: 1 p. 24 x 19 cm

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Summary of Content: Apparently a sentiment or quotation written on blue lined paper, removed from a notebook or autograph album. This may be unrhymed verse. "If they were generally and systematically whipt starved and shot to death and if there were no rational ground of hope for speedy relief, it would be the duty as well as the instinct of these people to rise up, not in squads of tens or companies of hundreds, and move off to the north..." Signed "Very truly yours" at the end.

Background Information:

Full Transcript: The Exodus.

While I would not underrate or deny that the colored people of the South have suffered and are still suffering great abuses and hardships - inhereted [sic] from ...a barbarous past condition, I may yet safely venture the opinion, that if they were generally and systematically, whipt [sic], starved and shot to death, and if the[struck: ir][inserted: re] were no rational ground of hope for speedy relief, it would be the duty as well as the instinct of these people to rise up not in squads of tens, or companies of hundreds, and move off to the North, but that thousands and tens of thousands should turn their backs upon the Sunny South, as Lot did upon Sodom and as the Hebrews did upon Egypt - even if they had to crawl away upon their hands and knees; and the fact that only the few leave and the millions remain behind - proves that their case is not quite so desperate as the advocates of Exodus would have us believe.
Very truly yours
Fredk.. Douglass -
Washington May 19th 1879
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People: Douglass, Frederick, 1818-1895

Historical Era: Rise of Industrial America, 1877-1900

Subjects: ReconstructionAfrican American HistoryAfrican American AuthorJim CrowImmigration and Migration

Sub Era: The Gilded Age

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