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Dorr, Thomas Wilson (1805-1854) General Orders

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC05757.05 Author/Creator: Dorr, Thomas Wilson (1805-1854) Place Written: Gloucester, Rhode Island Type: Autograph document signed Date: 25 June 1842 Pagination: 1 p. ; 25.1 x 19.9 cm.

Summary of Content: Governor Dorr sent this order with a letter (see GLC05757.03) to Millard, Low, & Miller, publishers of the Daily Express. Orders the mobilization of volunteer forces. "It has become the duty of all our citizenship who believe that the People are sovereign, and have a right to make and alter their forms of government, now to sustain by all necessary means, the Constitution adopted by the People of this State, and the Government elected under the same." Several edits. Dorr, then an illegitimate governor, led the Dorr Rebellion over suffrage rights in Rhode Island.

Background Information:

Full Transcript: Generall Orders
Head Quarters, Glocester,
R. I. June 25th, 1842.

I hereby direct the military of this State, who are in favor of the People's Constitution, to repair forthwith to head-quarters, ...thus to await further orders; and I request all volunteers, and volunteer companies, so disposed, to do the same. It has become the duty of all [inserted: our citizens] who believe that the People are sovereign, and have a right to make and alter their forms of government, now to sustain; [struck: the] by all necessary means, the Constitution [struck: of the] adopted and established by the People of this State, and the Government elected under the same. The only other alternative is an abject submission to a despotism, [struck: over the minds] in its various practical effects without a parallel in the history of the American States. I call upon the People of Rhode Island to assert their rights, and to vindicate the freedom which they are qualified to enjoy in common with the other citizens of the American Republic. I cannot doubt that [inserted and struck: as the descendants of the ancient] the [inserted: People of this State] will cheerfully and promptly respond to this appeal to their patriotism, & to their patriotism, & their sense of justice; & [struck: to their] that they will show themselves [inserted: in this experience] to be the worthy descendants of those ancestors, who aided in achieving our national independence.
[struck: Glocester, R.I.]
By command of the Governor, Thomas W. Dorr, Governor & Commander in Chief
William H. Potter, Adjutant General.
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People: Dorr, Thomas Wilson, 1805-1854
Millard, Low, & Miller, fl. 1842

Historical Era: National Expansion and Reform, 1815-1860

Subjects: Dorr RebellionRebellionGovernment and CivicsState ConstitutionElectionPoliticsSuffrageJournalism

Sub Era:

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