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Jackson, Henry (1747-1809) to Henry Knox

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Gilder Lehrman Collection #: GLC02437.03514 Author/Creator: Jackson, Henry (1747-1809) Place Written: Boston, Massachusetts Type: Autograph letter signed Date: 8 April 1787 Pagination: 4 p. : docket ; 29.7 x 18.9 cm.

Summary of Content: Expects the clothing for his men the next day and writes that "I pass'd yesterday at the Castle, [most likely Castle Island] & Inspected my Recruits, they are a fine body of Men, & want nothing but their Clothing to make them perfectly happy - " Hopes Knox will be able to influence Congress not to disband any of the troops, "Congress certainly will not disband any of the Troops without consulting the Secretary at War - I therefore flatter myself you will make such arrangements as to continue me in service..." States that [Nathaniel] Gorham is violently opposed to any troops being disbanded. Jackson has paid his officers and is making arrangements to pay the men as well, "It will not do, to pay the officers, & neglect the men, I shall therefore endeavor to keep them equal on this head." He is convinced that John Hancock will win the Massachusetts governorship. In a postscript, comments that he got the insurance on the ship Hope, which is traveling from New York to Canton, China and lists the men who took the policy.

Full Transcript: [draft]
Boston Apl. 8 1787
My dear Harry
your favor of the first Inst - came to hand by the post last Eveng the one for Capt. Hall shall be deliverd [him] ...-
tomorrow I expect to procure my Cloathing, and if I am not disappointed, I will inform you by the Thursday Post when it will be probable I shall get them done & be able to march - I have not the least doubt, that in two months after they are clothed. I shall have this State quota complete - I pass'd yesterday at the Castle & Inspected my Recruits they are a fine body of Men & want nothing but their Clothing to make them perfectly happy - nothing will give me more pleasure then to be stationed at Springfield, at least until I can fill up my Corps - it is the very best situation in the State for that purpose - when the detachment [2] detachment now under General Lincoln is discharged. I shall be on the spot to recruit the best of his men - Congress certainly will not disband any of the Troops without consulting the Secretary at War - I therefor flatter myself you will make such arrangements as to continue me in service - Indeed I hope and pray my whole corps will be [last] up - it will be cruel to disband them as most of my present officers were in my late Regiment when they recd. their death warrant - Mr Gorham sets out for New York tomorrow or next day - he is violently opposed to disbanding any part of the Troops, & I hope it will not take place until he arrives - delay this business as long as you can - yesterday I paid my officers, one month & a half subsistence, in solid coin, and this week I expect to pay them as much more - when I have completed their subsistence up to the [3] to the first of this month. I shall then make arrangements for some monthly pay to the officers & men - It will not do, to pay the officers, & neglect the men, I shall therefore endeavor to keep them equal on this head -
It is evident without a doubt that Mr. Hancock is certainly choosen Governour, he has at least 3/4 or 7/8 of the votes throughout the State - I believe you will not see him in N York as he intended - It is supposed that the Lt. Govr: will not be choosen by the People, that Lt. Govr. Cushing and our friend Lincoln will stand the highest on the list if so, the present Lt. Govr: will be appointd by the Legislature - the Senators formerly chosen are a miserable [set], and the good people are most alarmed at the completion of them - [4] our [Cincin] will met on Wednesday next, I please my self we shall send forward a respectable Delegation - If there is no impropriety, we talk of appointing you as one of them - Genl Lincoln will not be able to attend, If he should be appointed - [inserted: if] we had money to pay them we should find no difficulty in obtaing the best of men -
Mr Copeland is here from St. Georges I have had some conversation with him but the business remains much the same as when you saw him last fall -
My love to Lucy and your little [popets] -
I am your trusty affectionate
H Jackson
PS - I have got the Insurance done on the Ship [Hope], agreeably to your directions - that is to say - "Six hundred pounds [Lmny] on the Ship Hope, and her Cargo, from New York to Canton in China during her stay there, at and from thence to New York, with Liberty to touch at any port or Ports, going & returning" the premium customary here is [strikeout] [Pr. Ct] - which I attain'd for which I gave my note of land - the following persons took the Policy -
General Knox Joseph Russell Junr £200
John Fish £100
John Codman Junr £150
Cabot Hopkins £600
Total £600

[docket]
from Genl H Jackson
8 April 1787
See More

People: Jackson, Henry, 1747-1809
Knox, Henry, 1750-1806
Hancock, John, 1737-1793

Historical Era: The New Nation, 1783-1815

Subjects: Revolutionary War GeneralMilitary HistoryFortificationMilitary UniformsClothing and AccessoriesRecruitmentContinental CongressCongressGovernment and CivicsStanding ArmySoldier's PayFinancePoliticsElectionMaritimeAsiaCommerceMerchants and TradeInsurance

Sub Era: Creating a New Government

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